Who Has The Most Offers In High School Football The Balanced Line Single Wing Offense for Youth Football

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The Balanced Line Single Wing Offense for Youth Football

Most youth football teams that run a single-wing offense lack the traditional unbalanced set of lines.

Many coaches have asked me about using a single wing attack in a balanced line in youth soccer. For most coaches, they ask because they have “Special Rules” in their youth football leagues that require them to use balanced line formations. 2-3% of youth soccer leagues have rules like this.

It is very simple to modify an unbalanced single wing attack into a balanced set of lines. While most high schools that run a single-wing offense stick with an unbalanced set, a number of them also have a balanced set or two.

Menominee Michigan High School runs almost the entire single-wing offense from a balanced set of lines. Menominee won another state title last year, as well as defending Minnesota’s largest class (Waizata- 3,400 students) state champion. As most of you know, Menominee has only 550 students. It’s hard to argue with Menominee head coach Ken Hofer, who has over 250 wins in this balanced offense. Hofer is a legend in Single Wing circles and an excellent clinic speaker.

Some modifications are required if you launch a single wing attack from a balanced line:

The middle of the offensive line is the center, you’re now hitting the center. Pull the left guard on off-tackle runs to the right. Pull only the right guard (not the lever) when reversing to the left. Left move blocks GD, Gap-Down on traps on the left.

As you can see, switching to a balanced line is not a big deal if you are required to do so. If I were forced to commit this offense, these would be the changes I would make. I would make my power tackle the left guard because he would be my second most athletic lineman.

We all have to play by the rules of whatever leagues think makes sense, no matter how stupid they are. Don’t think or whine about it, just make adjustments and make it work.

For 150 Free Youth Soccer Coaching Tips: Youth Soccer Games

Copyright 2007 Cisar Management and http://vinningiouthfootball.com republishing this article are parts of it without including this paragraph and links are a copyright violation. Repost, just include the links.

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Who Has The Most Goal Contributions In Football History Preview of Chelsea’s 08-09 Season

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Preview of Chelsea’s 08-09 Season

Chelsea’s last campaign offered a striking commentary on the high stakes in modern top-flight football and the fine line between success and perceived failure. For the Blues, it was a season dominated by a generally unloved manager’s attempt to take the team further from where his much-loved predecessor had taken them.

Following Jose Mourinho to Stamford Bridge was always going to be a tall order, but anyone other than Abraham Grant, with any boss other than Roman Abramovich, would probably be praised for taking Chelsea so close to treble glory. Beaten in extra time of Carling Cup final; fell two points short of the Premier League title race despite amassing 85 points (the first time a team had amassed that many without securing the title); and beaten on penalties after extra time in the Champions League final – Grant’s stab at football immortality with the Blues was heroic.

But it was still a failure, and his reward – after being doubted, mocked and judged with faint praise – was the sacking, within days of John Terry hitting the post in a Moscow showdown to hand Manchester United the coveted European crown.

Chelsea have lost just two of their 32 Premier League games under Grant – his first, against United at Old Trafford and then against Arsenal at Ashburton Grove. In the critical latter stages of the season, the Blues beat both the Gunners and United at Stamford Bridge – and indeed kept the title race against Sir Alex Ferguson’s side alive until the final day of the campaign, which spoke volumes for their determination and consistency.

They have been relentless in their pursuit of the title, overhauling Arsenal at the end of March to finish second and come within a whisker of overtaking the defending champions. But dropping two points in a home draw against Wigan, for which Emile Heskey equalized in the 91st minute on April 14, proved costly, although United’s vastly superior goal difference was always worth an extra point if push came to shove.

It reflected the Achilles heel of Grant’s side: they played without the attacking flair and panache of United or Arsenal, and actually scored the fewest goals of the top four. Although they kept a remarkable 21 clean sheets at the other end, Abramovich demanded ‘expansive’ football after Mourinho but got more of the same prosaic, pragmatic stuff under Grant. Without the ability to tie it in with silverware, or win over skeptical home audiences, Grant was always on borrowed time. Speculation over his future, which reached a fever pitch after the Carling Cup final defeat to London rivals Tottenham and the embarrassing FA Cup quarter-final loss to Barnsley, has been a constant accompaniment to Grant’s reign.

His side showed character and resilience, particularly defensively, but often struggled for creativity and goals, with Didier Drogba scoring just eight in the league and January import Nicolas Anelka just one, despite playing mostly out of position. Dynamic central midfielder Michael Essien has also spent too much time being substituted at right-back, while the manager has failed to get anything out of expensive summer signing Florent Malouda. The result was an over-reliance on midfielders Frank Lampard (who had his own injury and personal problems last season) and Michael Ballack (who became the Blues’ most influential player in the final third of the campaign). Their goals and dynamism helped push Chelsea closer to glittering prizes, although it was symptomatic that pundits and many fans felt their contribution was despite, rather than thanks to, Grant’s leadership. It was a burden the Israeli imposed on him due to his lack of charisma.

Summer activity

The managerial soap opera at Stamford Bridge ended when Grant was unceremoniously sacked and his successor announced during Euro 2008 as Portugal coach Luiz Felipe Scolari. The Brazilian comes with everything that Grant lacked: gravitas, an extremely impressive CV, charisma, the authority that follows a reputation as a disciplinarian and the respect of the players. Scolari is still a World Cup winner who also won the Copa Libertadores twice.

If he has reserves because he has been out of club football for seven years, the risk seems to be low. The 59-year-old has been there and done that before, and if dealing with the English tabloid press is an aspect of his new job he’s unlikely to like, it’s unlikely to be any more uncomfortable than dealing with the media in his native Brazil.

Scolari is Chelsea’s fourth manager in the Abramsovic era; the previous three – Claudio Ranieri, Mourinho and Grant – were sacked despite delivering what most clubs would pass for relative success. So Scolari knows what to expect and what is expected: to win back the Premier League title from United and win the Champions League for the first time in Chelsea’s history. The second imperative is to achieve both through an exciting brand of entertaining, attacking football. Simple really. The key question is: can Scolari adapt to the demands of club football quickly and effectively enough to deliver what is needed in his first season back on the pitch?

He’s off to a good start. Drogba and Lampard, both widely tipped to join Mourinho at Inter Milan, are still at the Bridge and look set to stay at least next season. Portuguese defender Jose Bosingwa, well known to Scolari, was recruited and awaited, and since then another familiar face has arrived, the creative and motivated Deco. There is still speculation that Robinho could join them, and that would certainly bolster their attacking options and tighten up the goal threat, where the Blues were lacking last season. Fans would probably feel happier to have an additional quality striker, unless the form of Andrii Shevchenko and Claudio Pizarro underwent a dramatic transformation in the summer.

In terms of departures, Claude Makelele’s return to France should be adequately covered by the emergence of John Obi Mikel in the central midfield role, while Steve Sidwell, although a good player, was never really used so he won’t be missing. Nor will the transfers of Tal Ben Haim (Manchester City) and Khalid Boulahrouz (Stuttgart) leave holes in Scolari’s forces.

The pre-season was useful if busy: the goodwill trip to China and Malaysia was great PR, but Scolaria was probably of limited value in terms of preparation. But a trip to Moscow for the Railwaymen’s Cup offered a more important test and, losing another shootout in the Russian capital aside, Chelsea can reflect on last weekend with satisfaction. An emphatic 5-0 demolition of AC Milan made many sit up and take notice, as did Anelka’s four-goal barrage in the rout.

Scolari said he now more or less has his starting XI in mind for the Premier League opener against Portsmouth, so at least one of his main pre-season goals has been achieved.

Analysis and forecast

There will be huge interest in how well and quickly Scolari settles into his new job. He would get the benefit of the doubt, something Grant never enjoyed; but he will continue to be the specter of Mourinho, who won the Premier League and League Cup in his first season at the Bridge after arriving from Portugal. The parallels are there for direct comparison. His press conferences promise to be entertaining, but it’s on the pitch that the fun quotient will come under the most scrutiny.

The addition of Bosingwa should add real quality down the right to an already fearsome defence, with Petr Cech needing some luck behind him after an unlucky spell, so Chelsea will once again be one of the hardest teams to score against.

And in the midfield they have a real cornucopia. With Essien back in the center where he is at his best, Ballack in the form he showed during the latter stages of last season and at Euro 2008, Deco’s vision adding a new creative dimension to Chelsea’s game and Lampard fit and focus, Mikel offering the strength and running muscle , as well as Joe Cole, Shaun Wright-Phillips and Malouda to provide pace and width on the flanks, Scolari’s challenge will be to find the right mix and balance while keeping all his stars happy.

Anelka was given a warning in Moscow and Scolari may be ready to play to his strengths, through the middle, at Drogba’s expense in the way that Grant has been reluctant to do. The fact that Drogba is likely to miss the start of the campaign through injury could make that decision easier. Salomon Kalku impressed last season, but too often took the wrong option with his last ball, so we can expect improvement there.

Scolari has hinted that Shevchenko will not be in the starting line-up, at least initially, but the Ukrainian said he is determined to make an impact at Chelsea and if he is upbeat rather than confident when he comes off the bench, he will give his manager a useful option.

Chelsea will certainly challenge for the title, and with their squad strength and seemingly unbeaten home record, they are likely to be in the top few spots for most of the campaign. They have the playing resources and now, they hope, the right manager to win big again. But much will also depend on United, Arsenal and Liverpool at least, so how Scolari reacts to the challenge of the Big Four and how he plans his tactics in the head-to-head could be decisive.

I expect the Blues to be challenging on all fronts until the final stages, and possibly win the cup; but winning the Premier League title at Scolari’s first attempt, after a long spell out of the club game, could prove to be a bridge too far. Then he finished in the top three, but not in first place.

Coach: Luiz Felipe Scolari

Stadium: Stamford Bridge (42,055)

2007-08 Position: 2nd

2007-08 Record: P-38 V-25 D-10 L-3 GF-65 GA-26 GD-39 Pts-85

Players in:

Jose Bosingwa (FC Porto, £16.2m), Deco (Barcelona, ​​£8m).

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Who Has The Most Football Trophies In The World 4 Reasons Individual Awards (UEFA "Ballon D’Or" and FIFA "The Best") in Football Should Be Scrapped

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4 Reasons Individual Awards (UEFA "Ballon D’Or" and FIFA "The Best") in Football Should Be Scrapped

The Ballon d’Or is an award given by UEFA and France Football magazine, while “The Best” is awarded by FIFA, the ethically challenged arbiter of the world’s most popular sport. As prestigious as they are degenerate, both awards are nothing more than tangible compliments of writers and experts (confederation administrators, coaches, football team captains, fans, etc.) whose opinions and voices have been canvassed. Currently, both awards have become an egotistical first after the post, as no one embodies the toxic and political nature of both awards more than the recipients of the past decades. Comparing footballers across and within football leagues (for these awards) is a long-standing fan favorite. Like most sports awards, fans will always root for their favorites – but unlike many others, it’s hard to prove statistically that one player is more valuable than another. The point is that teams are like machines. One part, no matter how important, cannot function properly without the other. That makes the award only a measure of prolific goalscoring, but as any manager will tell you, that’s probably not enough to carry a successful football team. Comparisons between football players are essentially what make trading cards, sticker albums and fantasy football so popular, but it should have no place in an official capacity. And how can we improve what we currently have? The basic truth is that we cannot, unless the awards are terminated for the following reasons:

Soccer is a team sport: Debating individual soccer players among soccer fans is fun, but in a team sport with so many leagues, such individuality is impossible to accurately measure. Football (as we all know) is a team sport where eleven men from two separate teams of players compete against each other for a trophy or in modern times, to get paid at the end of it all. Every football team needs world-class goalkeepers, defenders, midfielders and forwards (extremely talented) to excel and win at home. [EPL, Serie A etc.]continental [CAF, UEFA Champions League] and intercontinental [FIFA Club World Cup] trophies. No one player or position is irreplaceable or superior to another because everyone must work in unison to achieve a common goal. Most of the great strikers of today (and years past) would probably be terrible defenders and goalkeepers, and most of the great defenders and goalkeepers could be terrible strikers and midfielders in the game. It is wrong to constantly elevate a certain group of footballers above their teammates because of their position on the field. Football matches are played ‘First’, by goals scored by strikers, midfielders, defenders and ‘Secondly’, by (potential) opponent goals stopped by defenders and goalkeepers of the same team. No player really wins a game unless he plays in all positions at the same time – while in his own penalty area he defends and deflects the opposition’s shots on goal and at the same time runs to score all kinds of goals in the opponent’s penalty area. Most of the FIFA and UEFA individual award winners play brilliantly when the pass and style of play suits them, which gives them a freedom that no other team would. Most managers strive to fit 11 players into the best team rather than having to fit the 11 best players into a team. There is a reason why respected managers around the world like Arsene Wenger and Jose Mourinho have categorically despised and condemned such individual awards in team sports.

Forward-biased: FIFA and UEFA award winners (now and in the past) are (almost) always players who play close to the opposition’s goal – such as strikers and midfield forwards – allowing them to score a lot of goals while trusting their team-mates (defender and goalkeeper) to prevent the opposing team from scoring and winning the game. In football, it is widely known and accepted that offense wins games, but defense wins titles and trophies. Very few defenders and goalkeepers are recognized for their performance on the pitch and the dirty work they do (so that their attacking teammates in the opposition goal can get the ball into the goal.) It is quite disheartening that forwards are paid much better than defenders and goalkeepers. Goalkeepers are usually the lowest paid on the football team, even with the alarming level of scrutiny directed at them, which begs the question of why anyone would choose to be a goalkeeper. No one has really found a way to compare the value of goalkeepers to outfielders – to the detriment of goalkeepers. Should a goal stopped by a goalkeeper be treated the same as a goal scored by a striker? How much should quality defenders influence our assessment of goalkeepers – and how much should quality midfielders influence our assessment of strikers? There’s no denying the fact that some players do improve the overall quality and effectiveness of certain teams, but even so, such exceptional players wouldn’t be able to win anything for their teams if, for example, a goalkeeper spilled every shot that came his way fired by the opposition. The beauty of modern football is that every player (except the goalkeeper) is required as a minimum to score goals whenever, however and whenever it suits him or (to some extent) his coach, which makes the fact that individual awards are only given to attacking players. he does his teammates and the sport a huge disservice.

No specific award criteria: There are no specific criteria for awarding individual awards to players by UEFA and FIFA in football competitions. Most fans and administrators don’t know which competitions – national league (EPL, La Liga, Serie A), continental leagues (UEFA Champions League – as all FIFA individual award winners are based in Europe) or international tournament (FIFA World Cup) – Player Performance they have the highest priority when making nominations for individual FIFA and UEFA awards. Although most of the nominees and winners of such awards play for football teams that are either champions in their domestic leagues or UEFA Champions League champions or World Cup champions (in a World Cup year) with their countries, some winners of such awards play for clubs and countries that they were not champions in domestic, continental and international tournaments. Lionel Messi won the 2010/2011 Ballon d’Or (for scoring 91 goals in a year) without winning the Spanish La Liga or the Champions League with Barcelona or the World Cup where Argentina beat other deserving players to win at least one of the above competitions.

It breeds individual and selfish footballers: In search of individual rewards from FIFA, some players forgo team work and effort, preferring to go out on the pitch alone – to show off (as the fans would say) – at the expense of the team. Such players don’t care if the team wins or loses the game as long as they score goals, increase the number of goals and fight for prizes by shooting at goal instead of passing the ball to a better positioned team-mate, taking every set-piece – free kicks, penalties, corners – they are awarded in the match even when they have a poor record in such a set piece. This creates cases where a player wins the Ballon d’Or or Player of the Year award for having the most goals in a football season in addition to 5 or 6 man of the match appearances and a few great highlight reels of the season while his team finishes that season trophyless and second best in the final of the competition.

In conclusion, if there must be individual awards (for whatever bizarre reason) then they should be based on objective criteria such as goals scored (best striker), saves (best goalkeeper) or crosses made (best defender ) etc. Even that wouldn’t make much sense because, again, scoring is a team effort. No player can score a goal without the help of his teammates. And yes, even solo goals require team efforts. It therefore becomes unfathomable why FIFA, football’s governing body, would hand out these awards which are destructive to the very nature of the sport it is supposed to regulate. FIFA should not lend its name to a beauty pageant.

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Who Has The Most Clean Sheets In Football History Manchester United’s Greatest Premier League Team

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Manchester United’s Greatest Premier League Team

With Manchester United on course for their lowest Premier League finish in the first season since Alex Ferguson’s retirement, Jane’s Jersey takes a look back at what we consider to be Manchester United’s greatest team since the Premier League was formed.

Peter Schmeichel (1991-1999)

Peter Schmeichel is arguably the best Manchester United goalkeeper EVER and one of the best goalkeepers the world has ever seen.

Schmeichel joined the club from Bromwich for a bargain price of £505,000 in the summer of 1991 and made his Manchester United debut in a 2-0 win over Notts County.

Schmeichel helped the club to their first league title in 26 years in the inaugural Premier League season by keeping an impressive 22 clean sheets.

Schmeichel won five Premier League titles, three FA Cups and one League Cup.

He also famously captained the team to the Champions League trophy in his final appearance for the club.

During his eight years at Manchester United, Schmeichel made 392 appearances, keeping an incredible 178 clean sheets and famously scoring one goal against Rotor Volgograd.

He became the first goalkeeper to keep 100 Premier League goals when he kept a clean sheet against Crystal Palace.

Schmeichel won the UEFA Goalkeeper of the Year in 1992, 1993, 1997 and 1998.

Gary Neville (1992-2011)

Gary Neville graduated from the famous “Class of 92” which included Ryan Giggs, Paul Scholes, David Beckham, Nicky Butt and Gary’s brother Phil.

Having captained the youth team to FA Youth Cup glory in 1991-92, Neville made his debut against Torpedo Moscow in the UEFA Cup in September 1992.

After Paul Parker was lost to injury, Gary Neville became the first team right back, a position he held until his retirement in 2011.

Following the departure of Roy Keane in November 2005, Neville was appointed club captain.

Neville made 602 appearances for the club and scored 7 goals, won 8 Premier League titles, 3 FA Cups, 2 League Cups and 2 Champions League trophies.

Dennis Irwin (1990-2002)

Dennis Irwin was one of the most reliable and consistent performers of his generation, although often underrated.

Irwin joined Oldham in the summer of 1990 from Oldham Athletic for £625,000, making his debut against Coventry City on 25 August 1990.

In his first season with the club, Irwin helped the club win the Cup Winners’ Cup, beating Barcelona in the final.

Irwin was an ever-present as Manchester United won their first league title in 26 years and was also present in every game of the double-winning season of 1993-94.

During his time at the club Irwin won seven Premier League titles, three FA Cups, one League Cup, one UEFA Champions League and one Cup Winners’ Cup.

Denis Irwin played 529 games and scored 33 goals for Manchester United before joining Wolverhampton Wanderers at the end of the 2001-02 season.

Jap Stam (1998-2001)

Jaap Stam only lasted just over three seasons, but proved to be very popular with the Manchester United faithful.

Stam joined the club from Dutch side PSV for a then world record fee of £10.6m for a defender and made his debut in a 3-0 defeat of Arsenal in the Charity Shield.

In his first season at the club, Stam helped Manchester United to the famous treble of the Premier League, the FA Cup and the European Champions League.

During his time at Manchester United, he became the first team to win three consecutive seasons.

Stam played 127 games for Manchester United and scored once against Leicester in a 6-2 win.

Stam was named UEFA’s best club defender of the year in 1998-99 and 1999-00.

Rio Ferdinand (2002-present)

Rio Ferdinand is one of the best centre-halves of a generation in football and arguably England’s most successful defender since the legendary Bobby Moore.

Ferdinand joined the club for a British record transfer fee of £30 million and remains the most expensive English footballer in history and the most expensive defender in world football.

Rio made his debut for the team on 27 August 2002 in a Champions League qualifier against Zalagerceg which Manchester United won 5–0.

Ferdinand helped Manchester United win the Premier League in his first season at the club, playing in 28 league games.

Ferdinand famously failed a drugs test in September 2003, earning him an eight-month ban.

Ferdinand played almost 450 games for Manchester United scoring 8 goals and winning six Premier League titles, two League Cups and one Champions League trophy.

Rio captained Manchester United in their memorable Champions League final penalty shootout win against Chelsea.

Ferdinand was in the FIFA World Cup for the 2007-08 season.

Ryan Giggs (1990-present)

Ryan Giggs is the oldest member of the “Class of 92” and the only one still playing at the ripe old age of 40.

Giggs made his debut for the club on 2 March 1991 in a 2–0 defeat and scored his first goal for the club in a 1–0 win over Manchester City.

Giggs is the only player to have appeared in every season of the Premier League since its inception in 1992.

Up until the 2013-14 season he also scored in every campaign.

Giggs is the most decorated player in the history of English football with an incredible 13 Premier League titles, 4 FA Cup winners medals, 3 League Cup winners medals and 2 Champions League winners medals.

Giggs played over 950 games for the club, a record for a Manchester United player, scoring 168 goals.

During a truly illustrious career, Giggs set numerous records including most Premier League appearances, most Champions League appearances, most goals by a British player in the Champions League and oldest goalscorer in the Champions League.

Cristiano Ronaldo (2003-2009)

Cristiano Ronaldo was often referred to as a show pony in his early years with his countless leaps that looked great but weren’t particularly productive.

During his time at the club under Ferguson, Ronaldo channeled his undoubted ability to become one of the best players in the world.

Ronaldo joined the club from Sporting Lisbon for £12.2m and impressed Alex Ferguson while playing in a friendly against Manchester United.

Ronaldo made his debut as a substitute on August 16, 2003. in a 4–0 win over Bolton and scored his first goal in a 3–0 win over Portsmouth.

In his first season Ronaldo helped Manchester United win the FA Cup by scoring the first goal in a 3–0 win over Millwall.

Ronaldo made 292 appearances for Manchester United and scored an impressive 118, including 42 goals in 49 appearances, as he helped Manchester United win the Premier League and Champions League, winning a number of personal awards in the process, including UEFA Club Footballer of the Year.

Ronaldo won three Premier League titles, one FA Cup, two League Cups and one Champions League trophy with Manchester United before leaving for Real Madrid for a world record £80 million.

Roy Keane (1993-2005)

Roy Keane was a dominant, tough and highly competitive central midfielder who embodied the spirit of Manchester United under Alex Ferguson.

Keane joined the club in the summer of 1993 signing from Nottingham Forest for £3.75 million and made his debut against Aston Villa on 23 August in a 2–1 win against Aston Villa.

During his first season at the club, Keane helped the team win the Premier League and the FA Cup to win a famous double.

Keane was given the captaincy at Manchester United following Eric Cantona’s shock retirement at the start of the 1997–98 season, a position he held until his departure in 2005.

Keane made 480 appearances during 12 years at the club, scoring 51 goals and winning seven Premier League titles, four FA Cups and one Champions League trophy.

Keane left the club on 15 December 2005 to sign for boyhood club Celtic.

Paul Scholes (1993-2011 and 2012-2013)

Paul Scholes is the last member of the “Class of 92” to feature in our greatest Premier League team Manchester United.

Scholes was arguably the best attacking midfielder of his generation, although he was occasionally let down by his ability to make mistakes in the match which saw him collect over 120 yellow cards and 10 red cards and famously miss the 1999 Champions League final through suspension.

Scholes made his debut for the club on 21 September 1994, scoring both goals in a 2–1 League Cup win over Port Vale.

During his first season as a first-team player, Scholes helped the side finish 2nd in the Premier League and reach the FA Cup final where they lost 1–0 to Everton.

Scholes retired from professional football at the end of the 2010-11 season before Ferguson persuaded him to return in January 2012.

During two spells at Manchester United, Scholes played 718 games and scored 155 goals, winning eleven Premier League titles, three FA Cups, two League Cups and two Champions League trophies.

Eric Cantona (1992-1997)

Eric Cantona was nicknamed “King Eric” by Manchester United fans, and many consider him Manchester United’s greatest player and his name still echoes around Old Trafford today.

Cantona signed for the club for £1.2 million from rivals Leeds United on 27 November 1992, making his debut as a substitute against Manchester City on 6 December 1992.

In his first season, Cantona helped the team win their first league title in 26 years, as they won the Premier League with 10 points clear of Manchester United.

In January 1995, Cantona attracted headlines for the wrong reasons when he Kung-Fued a Crystal Palace fan on his way back into the tunnel after being sent off. The incident led to Cantona being banned from football for eight months and many claim it cost Manchester United the league title.

Following the departure of Steve Bruce, Cantona was handed the captain’s armband at the start of the 1996–97 campaign which saw Manchester United win their fourth title in five years.

At the end of the 1996-97 season, Cantona surprisingly announced his retirement from professional football at the age of 30.

During his time at Manchester United, Cantona played 185 games, scored 82 goals and won four Premier League titles and two FA Cups.

Ruud van Nistelrooy (2001-2006)

The last position in the team was filled by Ruud van Nistelrooy, who is probably the best player to play for the team in the Premier League.

Van Nistelrooy signed for the club in the summer of 2001, moving from PSV Eindhoven for a fee of £19 million and made his debut in a 2–1 defeat to Liverpool.

In his first season with the club, Van Nistelrooy scored 23 goals in the league (including 8 consecutive matches to set a record he later broke) and 36 goals in all competitions.

During five years at the club Van Nistelrooy scored 150 goals in 219 appearances and won one Premier League title, one FA Cup and one League Cup.

With rumors of a rift with Ferguson, Van Nistelrooy left the club in July 2006 to sign for Real Madrid for a fee of £11 million.

Subs bench

– Edwin van der Sar

– Nemanja Vidic

– Ronnie Johnson

– David Beckham

– Lee Sharpe

– Wayne Rooney

– Ole Gunnar Solskjaer (best super sub!!)

Well, that’s our take on Manchester United’s greatest Premier League team, feel free to let us know if you disagree!

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Who Has The Largest Football Stadium In The Nfl The Original OJ Simpson Inspirational Story

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The Original OJ Simpson Inspirational Story

We’ve all heard of the OJ Simpson trial, but few people know the original inspirational story of OJ Simpson, the greatest running back in the National Football League during his time.

This inspiring story began when Oriental James Simpson was on July 9, 1947 in San Francisco with Eunice and Jimmy Simpson. OJ grew up in poverty and spent his early days in the ghetto when food was always in short supply. As a result, OJ suffered from malnutrition and developed rickets. At the age of six, OJ’s legs became permanently bowed and his calf muscles suffered severe atrophy. He earned the nickname “Pencil Legs” at an early age.

Growing up, OJ found his inspirational story in American football through All American running back Jim Brown of the Cleveland Browns. Brown was the best quarterback in the NFL at the time. But OJ was too poor to afford tickets to see his idol in action whenever Cleveland visited San Francisco. That never stopped his dream and goal of becoming a star in the future.

During those games when Cleveland played in San Francisco, OJ would diligently wait outside the stadium until the maintenance crew opened the stadium gates late in the 4th quarter. Then he would go to the stadium and drown in the last few minutes of the game, dreaming of seeing his idol as well as his own goals and the inspirational story of becoming a professional footballer.

On one of these occasions at the age of thirteen, he finally realized his dream of meeting his idol, Jim Brown. As the inspirational story unfolded, he walked up to Brown and said, “Mr. Brown, I’m your biggest football fan!” Brown thanked the boy politely and went on his way. But OJ persisted in asking for Brown’s autograph. While Brown was signing autographs, OJ told him how he had all his pictures on the wall and knew all the football records Brown held. Brown was flattered and thanked his young child again. Before leaving, OJ surprised Brown by saying, “Mr. Brown, one day I will break every one of your records!”

OJ Simpson broke all but three of the rushing records held by Jim Brown before injuries cut short his football career and inspirational story. Goal setting is the strongest force of human motivation. Set a goal and achieve it.

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Who Has The Highest Hat Trick In Football History Did Cristiano Ronaldo Deserve To Be World Player Of The Year 2014?

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Did Cristiano Ronaldo Deserve To Be World Player Of The Year 2014?

The recent awarding of the 2014 FIFA Ballon d’Or (World Player of the Year) to Cristiano Ronaldo proves that the award is more about politics and personal popularity than performance on the pitch.

Although players from several nationalities are nominated and win the award, they all always play for European clubs, while those active in other leagues, such as South America and Mexico, are generally overlooked. The best player is chosen by players and managers based on favoritism rather than merit, which often creates unworthy winners. With that, the award lost its recognition and became an object of fun and ridicule.

The Ballon d’Or was established by France Football magazine in 1956 to honor the history makers of the game. But that’s not what it turned out to be.

LA LIGA

Between 1 January and 31 December 2014 in this competition, Lionel Messi scored 35 goals in 36 matches (11 with his right foot, 23 with his left and another header) while Cristiano Ronaldo scored 38, but with less variety as they were only 4 goals. head and unfavorable left leg.

In addition, Messi created 97 chances, 24 more than any other player and completed 164 dribbles, 63 more than nearest rival Iker Muniain of Atletico Bilbao (MAILOnline – Why Lionel Messi should win the Ballon d’Or after a record-breaking year with Barcelona; author Kieran Gill, 12 January 2015).

EUROPE

Messi conquered the continent on November 25 when he became the all-time top scorer in the Champions League in Nicosia, Cyprus. It was his 23rd European city, his 16th European country and marked the 24th different stadium in which he scored (MAILOnline etc)

WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP 2014

In football’s most important competition, Messi led Argentina to the final, was voted the best player in 4 games (the most of any player in the competition) and won the Golden Boot as the best player of the tournament.

He had the most impact on the competition. His goals were the winning goals that took Argentina to the final. He was joint third top scorer with 4 goals and 1 assist, created the most chances, had the most successful dribbles, made the most crosses in the box and produced the most balls of any player.

In contrast, Ronaldo was a non-factor and only scored a late goal against minnows Ghana and had an assist against the USA.

HISTORY MAKER

Messi’s performance in 2014 was what the Ballon d’Or is all about, namely, history-making performances. On March 16, he became Barcelona’s all-time top scorer (371). A week later he became the top scorer of El Clasico (matches between Real Madrid and Barcelona) (21) with a hat-trick.

He scored his 400th career goal on 27 September against Granada and surpassed a 59-year-old record to become La Liga’s all-time top scorer (253) on 22 November. Three days later, he overtook Raúl by scoring a hat-trick and became the top scorer in the history of the Champions League (74).

Given all these achievements, one might think that of the three nominees, Messi is the most deserving to win the award. Instead, he not only lost to Ronaldo, but he and fellow candidate Manuel Neuer combined received fewer votes (31.48%) than Ronaldo (37.66%).

In 2013, Ronaldo won nothing and Franck Ribery won everything, but Ronaldo still beat him.

How can all this be explained?

THE POLITICS BEHIND THE VOTING

FIFA criteria require national managers, captains and media officials to vote for the most outstanding player in the previous twelve months.

Not unexpectedly, players vote for their teammates and compatriots. For example, in the 2014 competition, Bastian Schweinsteiger (Germany) gave all three places to the Germans, Manuel Neuer, Philipp Lahm and Thomas Muller.

Diego Godin (Atletico Madrid) voted for his former teammates Diego Costa and Thibaut Courtois.

Vincent Kompany (Belgium) voted for teammates Thibaut Courtois and Eden Hazard as the two best players in the world, while Arjen Robben is third.

The best example of politics in all of this is illustrated by Robert Lewandowski (Bayern Munich) who, without giving any reason, stated that he regretted voting for Ronaldo instead of his teammate Neuer. This ‘change of mind’ can only be explained as coming from a player wanting to save face with his teammates in the dressing room, rather than a voter with any real conviction.

The same criticism applies to managers who only vote for national players. For example, the Argentine manager Gerardo Martino gave all three places to his compatriots namely Lionel Messi, Angel di Maria and Javier Mascherano, Belgium coach Marc Wilmots voted for the Belgian Thibaut Courtois for the third place, Didier Deschamps (France) gave the final place to the French striker Benzema and Dutchman Guus Hiddink paid the highest honor to compatriot Arjen Robben.

Players will get a lot of votes if they are popular ‘with the boys’ and can play in front of cameras to advertise commercial products. Those who defend the choice of Ronaldo as the best player point out that in the second half of 2014 he scored 32 goals. The problem is that 9 of those goals were penalties, so his non-penalty goals were 23, the same as Messi who had no penalties. Ronaldo was nicknamed “Penaldo” because of his mastery in drawing and scoring penalties.

In a World Cup year like 2014, your performance in that tournament is what defines you. On the world’s biggest stage, Ronaldo was a non-factor, and his supporters justify it by saying that he had an injury. If that’s true, it’s unfortunate, but an injury is a misfortune, not a privilege, and he can only be judged on actual performance, not speculation on what he might have achieved had he been fully fit.

The player of the year award has lost its authenticity. But it doesn’t have to be that way. It’s not a personality or school prom competition. It should recognize performance on the field. Perhaps FIFA officials should become referees themselves, pay more attention to non-European clubs and use criteria such as achievements and fair play to choose the winner. This would not be a perfect system, but it would be preferable to the current one which is deeply flawed and cannot be taken seriously.

Victor A. Dixon

January 18, 2015

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Who Has The Best Record In The Nfl Football 2008 Indianapolis Colts Outlook

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2008 Indianapolis Colts Outlook

The Indianapolis Colts have come a long way since the days of the Dallas Texans – so much so, in fact, that the NFL insists the two teams should not be associated today. (Probably due to confusion stemming from Houston Texas) The Colts have created their own legends since 1953 when they were renamed the Baltimore Colts, and have won three NFL championships and two Super Bowl championships, the last victory in 2006. XLI. The Indianapolis Colts’ chances in 2008 remain promising, especially given last year’s 13-3 final record. The Colts played very well, but lost their divisional round to the San Diego Chargers in the playoffs. Now that the team is heading into its 56th season, it may be time to give back, especially when they play the Chargers in a rematch on November 23, 2008.

For the first time in 24 seasons, the Colts will begin play from Lucas Oil Stadium, leaving behind the RCA Dome. Management is pleased with coach Tony Dungy for this season, just as they have been for the past seven, and with quarterback Peyton Manning, who returns as the starting quarterback for an 11th season. This may or may not be Tony Dungy’s last season, as he has announced that he will be back for at least one more season. Whether or not we see him next year may depend on the team’s final score in 2008. The Colts also promoted Jim Caldwell to associate head coach, which puts him in line to succeed Tony Dungy whenever he decides to retire.

The team released three players, including wide receiver Crafons Thorpe, defensive tackle Anthony McFarland and linebacker Rob Morris. The team also lost rookies Michael Boyman and Dan Kleczko to the Philadelphia Eagles, Jake Scott to the Tennessee Titans and Benjamin Jeffrey Utekt to the Cincinnati Bengals. The NFL Draft also provided Indianapolis with some exciting new prospects. The team got center Mike Pollack from Arizona State, linebacker Philip Wheeler from Georgia Tech, tight end Jacob Tame from Kentucky, linebacker Marcus Howard from Georgia, tight end Tom Santee from Virginia, center Steve Justice from Wake Forest, running back Mike Hart from Michigan, wide receiver Pierre Garcon of Mount Union and center Jamie Richard of Buffalo.

Reactions to the 2008 Indianapolis Colts were mixed. Their rematch against the San Diego Chargers is getting a lot of interest, even though most NFL fans are leaning towards the Colts. The Chargers are seen as a wild card winner and respected by most football pundits who call them one of the most talented teams in the entire NFL. In fact, last year’s 13-3 losing streak was one of the best in all of sports, second only to New England’s 18-0 effort to break the best record and Dallas’ impressive 13-3 record.

Don’t count out the Colts just yet; they dominated the NFL in 2006, winning their fifth overall championship and earning one of the best records in the league for the following season. The Colts may still be hungry for more glory than the pigskin.

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Who Has The Best Offensive Line In Football 2022 Is "Gap, On, Down (GOD)" Blocking Better Than "Severe Angle Blocking (SAB)" for Youth Football?

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Is "Gap, On, Down (GOD)" Blocking Better Than "Severe Angle Blocking (SAB)" for Youth Football?

This topic is getting a lot of attention on soccer coaching forums and soccer coaching sites. There is much debate as to which blocking system is preferable for young men playing football. I have my own opinion.

Both systems contain basic “principles” or “rules” that must be followed to ensure the EFFECTIVENESS of the system. So any system can be used. The question becomes implementation – practice time with the necessary techniques, coach preference, what the kids you have on your team can do. Let’s discuss these questions.

Practice time and required techniques

YEAR – Gap, On, Down

This system is more focused on “what you do to whom in a certain place” rather than the details on “technique”. This is a big difference when you consider the time to practice. In the GOD system, the offensive lineman literally asks, “what is the position of the defensive lineman or linebacker so I know where/who to block?”. You might be wondering what Gap, On, Down is? I will explain.

Inside Gap Defender

First we ask our offensive lineman to FIRST see if there is a defender lined up in the “inside gap”, within 1 yard of the line of scrimmage, to his spot on the offensive line. If he does, he has to block him after the shot — of course, emphasizing a quick first two steps and getting down. If there is no defender lined up in the “inside gap”, he simply goes to the SECOND blocking rule.

He Defender

If no defender lines up in the “inside gap”, then he moves on to his SECOND rule – Is the defender lined up “on/over” me, within 1 yard of the line of scrimmage? If it is, then the offensive lineman must block it after the snap. If there is no defender positioned “on/over” him, he simply goes to the THIRD blocking rule.

Down the line Inside Defender

If no defender lines up on/over him, then he moves on to his THIRD rule – I must look for a defender who is inside down the line – either on/over my offensive neighbor OR in the gap INSIDE my offensive neighbor. HELPING my neighbor block it! This is ALWAYS a double team block!

What we NEVER HAVE As a rule

We never have our offensive lines looking to block a defender that is off their body. In other words, we NEVER ask our offensive linemen to “get to” the block. This is a very difficult block to execute. Our backs are in the backfield and we handle these “athletic” blocks. At best, the trailing cornerback may be asked to make a “reach” or “throw” block, but never any other offensive lineman. This is because we know our protector is able to execute this block.

Also, never do our offensive linemen go to the “second level” to block running backs – except for our running back. Linebackers are more athletic and it is difficult for linemen to get to “moving” backs who are often 3 yards behind the line of scrimmage.

Blitzing Linebackers & The “Down” Double Team Block

I should explain that defensive teams do blitz – oh, shocker! So how would you handle this with a BOG blocking scheme where the linebacker could “break” your offensive line on the blitz? Here’s what we’re learning. If an offensive lineman simply executes a “one-on-one” GAP or ON block, they would NEVER come off that block to “get” the blitzing linebacker; this would allow their defensive lineman to get loose – not good! Therefore, the only situation in which we “get” a blitzing linebacker is in the “down-double team” block. Which one “gets” the linebacker? ALWAYS a double team inside linebacker & ONLY if the blitz linebacker is INSIDE this double team block; if he hits outside – trying to tackle over our offensive line wall – we’ll have one of our backs, by play design, block him in the lane/funnel! Obviously, you will need to work on this recognition with your offensive linemen running double team blocks so they know that ONLY the “inside blocker” is releasing to block the blitzing linebacker when he tries to blitz to the inside gap. Again, this is all about practice, practice, practice!

Summary of GOD

Now you might be thinking, “how will my offensive line really know who to block?” in a real defensive front situation. Well, like everything else in football, you have to practice things over and over again. Specifically, the best tactic is to show your offensive line the most common and likely defensive fronts they’ll see in games – including likely linebacker hits. Put this into practice for them; talk about the front, ask them who they would block for each front, have them pass to each person they would block, then run through it at half speed, then full speed. Do this for every defensive front you would likely see. Make sure they actually get it! Of course, you’ll also check for proper blocking fundamentals – cadence explosion/snap, quick feet, proper guard draw and low hold. The GOD rules are really simple and it only takes 1 week to install specific “mark plays/line calls” – no matter what offensive system you choose to run.

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Who Has Sung The Sunday Night Football Theme Song Mobsters – The Cotton Club

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Mobsters – The Cotton Club

THE BLACKS WERE ON THE STAGE.

THE WHITES WERE AT THE TABLES.

THE MOBSTERS WERE BEHIND THE SCENES.

AND SOMEHOW THE MAGIC TOUCHED THEM ALL – Jim Haskins – “The Cotton Club.”

In the 1890’s, Harlem was the land speculator’s dream. The elevated railroad lines that had been extended to 129th Street in Manhattan, had transformed the area from the hinterlands to what was called “The Great Migration.”

At the time, black families lived mostly in the area between Thirty-Seventh Streets and Fifty-Eight Streets, between Eighth and Ninth Avenues. The upper crust of society viewed Harlem as the next step for the upwardly mobile, and as a result, splendorous townhouses costing thousands more than comparables downtown, were being built as fast as the Harlem land could be purchased by the land speculators.

By 1905, the bottom of the Harlem real estate market fell though the floor. The land speculators were forced to face the fact that the townhouse had been built too quick, and that the prices were far above what the people were prepared to pay for them.

On the verge of bankruptcy, the land speculators used tactics that today would be illegal. They decided to rent their buildings to black tenants, far above what they would charge white tenants. Then, in a frenzy to recapture their losses, the land speculators approached white building owners and told them if they didn’t purchase vacant buildings they would rent them out exclusively to blacks, thereby reducing the value of the white landowner’s properties. The white landowners didn’t bite, so the land speculators made good on their promises. Whites began moving out of Harlem in droves, replaced by black families who had never lived in such a fine neighborhood before. Black churches followed their congregations from the slums of Manhattan to the splendor of Harlem, and by the early 1920’s, Harlem was the largest black community in the United States.

However, most blacks could not afford the high rents charged by the white building owners, so they took in tenants, causing two and sometimes three families to live in a one, or two-bedroom apartment. Coinciding with the overcrowding of Harlem, came the influx of illegal enterprises, such as numbers runners, houses of prostitution, and drug dealers. This was counteracted somewhat when prosperous blacks, mostly in the entertainment business, decided Harlem was where they could showcase their talents in a neighborhood filled with people of their own race. Fritz Pollard, noted All-American football player, who made his money in the real estate, moved to Harlem, as did fellow All-America football player Paul Robeson — destined to hone an outstanding career acting and singing on stage. They were quickly followed by famous singers like Ethel Walters and Florance Mills, and Harlem was ready for a renaissance equal to that of the glowing White Way on Broadway.

However, when there was money to be made, white gangsters like Dutch Schultz and Owney “The Killer” Madden were ready to jump in and take the profits, by force if necessary, which is the way they did business anyway. Schultz muscled his way into the Harlem numbers business, chasing out such black notables as Madam Stephanie St. Claire and Caspar Holstein. And during the height of Prohibition, Madden had his eyes on the perfect place to sell his bootleg booze: The Club Deluxe on 142nd Street and Lenox Avenue.

The Club Deluxe was owned by former world heavyweight champion Jack Johnson, the first black heavyweight champion of the world. Whereas, Johnson was proficient with his fists, Madden and his formidable crew were good with guns, knives, and bats. A few choice words, backed with the threat of violence, with few meager bucks thrown in, and Johnson handed over Club Deluxe to Madden and his partner/manager George “Big Frenchy” DeMange. The two gangsters renamed it The Cotton Club.

Not to totally insult a black man with the prestige of Johnson, Madden threw Johnson a bone, and let him hang around the joint, resplendent in a tuxedo. Johnson would smile and tell everyone who asked that he was the assistant manager under DeMange.

To understand why such a great heavyweight boxer like Johnson would cower before Madden, who was barely five-foot-five-inches and 140 pounds after a huge dinner, one would have to be made aware of Madden’s background.

Owen “Owney” Madden was born at 25 Somerset Street, in Leeds, England, on December 18, 1891. In need of work, his father moved the Madden family to Liverpool. In 1903, when young Madden was only 12, his father died, and his mother re-located her family to America, settling on the West Side of Manhattan, in a neighborhood called “Hells Kitchen.”

Madden fell in with a boisterous gang known as the Gophers. He became proficient in the favored crimes of the era: robberies, muggings, and labor racket beatings. In order to hurt and intimidate, Madden’s favorite weapon was a lead pipe, wrapped in newspaper.

Madden made a ton of money in a racket called the “insurance business.” As the president of his own “insurance company,” Madden would visit the local establishments and tell the business owners that the owner needed “bomb insurance,” in case foreigners, or maybe even Madden himself, decided to bomb the businessman’s store. The business owners caught wind quick, and paid Madden what he demanded. If they didn’t pay Madden, that’s businessman’s stores would go up in flames and debris in a matter of days, and sometimes even hours. While Madden was a member of the Gophers, and making tons of money in his “insurance business,” he was arrested 44 times, but not once did he ever go to prison.

When Madden was 17, he earned his nickname “The Killer.” A poor Italian immigrant did nothing wrong, except cross paths with Madden on a street in Hell’s Kitchen. In front of a crowd of his fellow Gophers, and whomever else was standing on the street that day, Madden pulled out a gun and shot the Italian dead. Then Madden stood over the dead body and announced to the assembled crowd, “I’m Owney Madden!”

By the time he was 23, Madden had at least five other murders to his credit. Hence the nickname – “The Killer.”

However, Madden thought he was bulletproof, until November 6th, 1912, at the Arbor Dance Hall, which was in the heart of the territory controlled by the Gopher’s rivals: the Hudson Dusters. Madden strolled into the hall by himself, like he had nary a care in the world, during a dance given by the Dave Hyson Association. Madden was watching the proceedings from the balcony, when eleven Hudson Dusters surrounded him and shot Madden six times. Madden was rushed to the hospital, where a detective asked Madden who had shot him.

“Nothin’ doin,'” Madden said. “It’s no business but mine who put these slugs into me. My boys will get them.”

By the time Madden was released from the hospital, six of his eleven assailants had already been shot dead.

While Madden was recuperating from his wounds, one of his fellow Gophers, Little Patsy Doyle, figured he’d take control of Madden’s gang. Doyle was also intent on taking back his former girlfriend, Freda Horner, who now was the sole property of Madden. Miss Horner told Madden about Doyle’s intentions, and as a result, Madden told Miss Horner to tell Doyle she would be glad to meet him for a date at a saloon on Eighth Avenue and 41st Street. When Doyle arrived, dressed to the nines and all smiles, two of Madden’s gunmen shot Doyle dead.

Being the obvious suspect, Madden was arrested three days later for the murder of Little Patsy Doyle. At Madden’s trial, he was shocked to discover that Miss Horner had betrayed him too. Miss Horner testified in court that it was Madden who had set up the Doyle murder. As a result, Madden was convicted and sentenced to 10-20 years in Sing Sing Prison. He did only eight years, and was released in 1923, just in time to strong-arm Jack Johnson into selling him the Club Deluxe, a.k.a.- The Cotton Club. By this time Madden was big into bootlegging with his partner Big Bill Dwyer, and the Cotton Club was the perfect place to sell their illegal hootch, especially their famous Madden No. 1 beer, which was considered the best brew in New York City. They took in a legitimate guy named Herman Stark as their front man/partner/stage manager, but the show within the show was completely run by Madden and DeMange.

According to Jim Haskins book The Cotton Club, when Madden and DeMange took over the joint they redid the entire interior “to cater to the white downtowner’s taste for the primitive.” The club was made over in “jungle decor,” with numerous artificial palm trees dotted throughout the spacious establishment, which had seating for 700 people. The most exquisite draperies, tablecloths, and fixtures were purchased, indicating this was a “plush late-night supper club,” and the exorbitant prices highlighted that fact. The menu was varied. Besides the traditional steaks and chops, the Cotton Club cooks drummed up Chinese and Mexican dishes, as well as “Harlem” cuisine like fried chicken and barbecued spareribs.

DeMange presided over the front door like a tyrant. One rule was perfectly clear. Although the waiters, busboys, bartenders, cooks, service personnel, and performers were all black, no black people were allowed inside as customers. (The name itself – The Cotton Club — came from the light brown color of undyed cotton.) The chorus girls had to be “tall, tan, and terrific” which meant that they had to be at least 5-feet-6-inches tall, light skinned, and no older than twenty-one. The girls also had to be expert dancers, and at least be able to carry a tune. For some unknown reason, there was no color-shade restriction on the black male dancers, who were all proficient in “high-stepping, gyrating and snake-dancing.”

To show how strict Madden and DeMange were about their policy of segregation, about a month before their second grand opening, (The Cotton Club was closed by Prohibition agents for a while, ever though the local cops were on the pad), the following job interview took place. Present were Madden and DeMange, along with their choreographer Althea Fuller, and their orchestra conductor Andy Preer. The girl being interviewed was Queenie Duchamp.

DeMange to Madden: Boss, when is the club going to be ready to open?

Madden: The pigs won’t cause us trouble for a time. They know if we’re forced to close for bootlegging they won’t get their bonuses. As it is, they’re missing the extra padding and the boys have been complaining to the Sarge. Yeah, they’ve learned their lesson. As for the club’s show… let’s ask Althea and Andy.

DeMange to Preer: Andy, how’s the pit? Ready for next month’s opening?

Preer: We will be. If Althea gets her girls ready, the pit is ready to stomp.

Althea Fuller: Boss, we had a setback. One of the girls went and found a “moral conscience.” She’s following her sister, a Garveyite, back to Africa. Shame, she was a looker in the front line. Don’t worry, Boss, I’ve already got replacements ready to audition for you today. One of them looks promising and comes with a recommendation. She’s in the front row, third one in… Queenie Duchamp. First, let’s see if she can remember the steps she was taught this morning.

(Andy Preer leads the orchestra in “I’ve Found a New Baby” and 5 dancing girls audition. Queenie Duchamp is third from the left.)

Madden: Keep the third and the fifth. The other girls are too dark and short. Althea, make sure you grill them about rules and rehearsals. We are NOT running a gut bucket operation here.

(Madden leaves with his bodyguards)

Fuller: Queenie, come here. You got the job on a few conditions.

Queenie: Anything you want Miss Fuller.

Fuller: Number one – No booze, No boys, No drugs. No exceptions.

Queenie: Yes, Miss.

Fuller: Number two- Rehearsals are Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday starting at 1:00 p.m. sharp. All rehearsals are MANDATORY and lateness will not be accepted. I don’t know what you’ve heard, but rehearsals here are grueling and performances are long with many elaborate costume changes. That means you can’t afford to be draggin’ your ass around here. Make sure you eat and get your rest. Do you understand?

Queenie: Yes, Miss Fuller.

Fuller: Number three – No mixing with the patrons. There are about 700 whitefolk that walk through those doors every night. And according to Mr. Madden, they only have one goal here and that’s to spend money. They come here to hear the best Negro music and dance numbers in the city. They might act like they want to be your friend after a couple of drinks, but they don’t. Mr. Madden doesn’t want the races mixin’ and as far as I’m concerned, I think that’s better for business anyway.

DeMange: If a white customer starts to give you a problem or tries to make a connection with you, tell me. I’ll take care of it. It’s happened before. Sometimes these rich people get a couple drinks in them and they think they own the world. Don’t worry about it, just let me know. We run a tight ship here.

Queenie: Yes, Mr. DeMange. No problem Ms. Fuller. I am an entertainer and I understand the importance of practice. In fact, I’m a singer, a blues singer! If you ever need a singer….. (Ms. Fuller and Mr. DeMange look at each other.)

Fuller: Look, missy. Your goal here is to dance, smile and follow the rules… not sing. Got it?

Queenie: Yes, Miss Fuller. Got it.

Fuller: Another thing… stay out of trouble. You’re a looker and the club world can be dirty and dangerous. It doesn’t have to be though. Keep to yourself and whatever you do, stay out of Mr. Madden’s way. If you do this, you’ll be fine. Now go to wardrobe for a fitting.

Queenie: Yes and Thank you, Miss Fuller.

The Cotton Club was an immediate success with the downtown swells. On opening night, the Fletcher Henderson band entertained the crowd (Henderson’s band was the house band until June 1931). Through radio broadcasts originating nightly from the Cotton Club, Henderson’s band was such a success, he became one of the most sought after band leaders in America. Following Henderson was the Duke Ellington Band (until 1934), and then Cab Calloway and the Cotton Club Orchestra.

Despite the fact the only booze served on the premises was Madden’s No. 1 beer, customers were allowed, even encouraged, to bring their own booze they had obtained illegally elsewhere. Of course, the management had a hefty set-up charge, which included the glasses, ice, and the mixers. If a customer came unprepared and still wanted booze instead of beer, the doorman, and sometimes even a waiter, came in handy. A bottle of champagne could cost a customer $30, and a bottle of scotch – $18, a kingly sum in those days. But the customers were well-healed, and nobody ever gripped about the prices; at least, nobody who cared about their continued good health.

After a while, DeMange and Madden lightened up a bit on the “no-black-customers-allowed” policy. This happened in 1932, right after W.C. Handy, known as “The King of the Blues,” was denied admission, even though the Duke Ellington Band was inside playing songs that Handy had written. Ellington pleaded his case to Madden, and Madden agreed to loosen his policy. But just a little bit.

Light-skinned blacks were now allowed in as customers, and a few darker blacks, who were famous entertainers themselves. However, blacks in mixed parties was a definite no-no.

Writer and photographer Carl Van Vechten wrote, “There were brutes at the door to enforce the Cotton Club’s policy which was opposed to mixed parties.”

Jim Haskins wrote in The Cotton Club, “Only the lightest-complexioned Negroes gained entrance, and even they were carefully screened. The club’s management was aware that most white downtowners wanted to observe Harlem blacks, not with mix with them.”

Even famed comedian Jimmy Durante displayed blatant racism when he said, “It isn’t necessary to mix with colored people if you don’t feel like it. You have your own party and keep to yourself. But it’s worth seeing. How they step!”

Durante went as far as to intimate that blacks were innately more violent than whites. “Racial lines are drawn here to prevent possible trouble,” Durante said. “Nobody wants razors, blackjacks or fists flying. And the chances of war are less if there’s no mixing.”

In 1933, after he settled a little problem with the IRS, and with Prohibition now over, Madden decided to call it a day. He handed over the reigns of the Cotton Club to DeMange, and hightailed it to Hot Springs, Arkansas, where he opened a hotel/spa, which became the favorite hideout for New York mobsters on the lam from the law. In fact, when New York Mafioso Lucky Luciano was in hiding, because a bulldog special prosecutor named Thomas E. Dewey had a warrant for Luciano’s arrest on a trumped-up prostitution charge, it was at Madden’s resort where Luciano was finally arrested after four months on the run.

Of course, Madden was still a silent partner with DeMange in the Cotton Club, but the huge profits would soon diminish, before coming to a halt in Harlem.

It started with the Great Depression, which had cut down dramatically on the disposable income of the rich, and the formerly rich. Downtown revelers who had frequented the Cotton Club came less often, and when they did come, they spent less money. These same revelers got caught up in the street gang mentality, and as a result, an avalanches of bullets stared flying in Harlem; whites shooting blacks, blacks shooting whites, and members of the same race slinging shots at each other. With so much lead zinging though the Harlem air, white-oriented Harlem clubs like the Cotton Club suffered a dramatic decrease in attendance.

In addition, no area of America was affected more by the Depression than Harlem. By 1934, according to the New York Urban League, more than 80% of Harlem residents were on “Home Relief,” which we now call Welfare. The Reverend Adam Clayton Powell fanned the flames of racial tensions when he started leading boycotts of white-owned stores in Harlem, in order to force them to hire more black workers. Despair and resentment sprung up in the streets of Harlem, and this lead to a fateful day in Harlem history.

A dark-skinned, 16-year-old Puerto Rican named Lino Rivera was sulking around the streets of Harlem, out of work and desperately looking for a job; any job. To pass the time, he took in a movie, then went to the Kress Department Store on 125th Street. There he spotted a knife he wanted. But the knife cost ten cents and Rivera didn’t have ten cents. Rivera had just snatched the knife and put it into his pocket, when a male employee of the store grabbed Rivera, and a scuffle ensued. While the two men were battling and another white employee tried to subdue Rivera, a crowd of black shoppers surrounded the fight, obviously favoring Rivera. During the melee, Rivera bit the thumb of one of the white employees. The injured man shouted, “I’m going to take you down to the basement and beat the hell out of you.”

Big mistake.

Within minutes, the rumor had spread on the streets of Harlem that two white men were beating a black boy to death. This false rumor received dubious confirmation, when a blaring ambulance pulled up in front of the Kress Department Store. It made no difference the ambulance was there for the white man who had the severely bitten finger.

That night the streets of Harlem erupted in total bedlam. Born out of resentment of the Depression, and the dismal way white people had been treating black people in Harlem for years, hundred of blacks rioted in the streets. They looted white-owned stored and pilfered merchandise as if they had an absolute right to take it.

The perception to the downtown whites was that Harlem was no longer safe for them to venture into, even to see the wondrous entertainment at the Cotton Club. In addition, black musicians and entertainers no longer considered the Cotton Club as the top of the heap. It became a place where the entertainers could start their careers, but once they got noticed, they went on to bigger and better things. Business became so bad at the Cotton Club, and other Harlem clubs that catered to the white downtown crowd, such as Small’s Paradise on 7th Avenue, that Harlem’s Cotton Club closed its doors for good on February 16th, 1936.

DeMange and Herman Stark, with Madden’s blessing from Hot Springs, moved the Cotton Club downtown to Forty-Eighth Street and Broadway, to a space formerly occupied by the Harlem Club. The new Cotton Club was an immediate success. It had its grand re-opening on September 24th, 1936. Cab Calloway and Bill “Bojangles” Robinson performed that night, as did Avis Andrews, the Berry Brothers, and the gorgeous Katherine Perry, who was so light-skinned she could easily pass for white.

Because it was so accessible with its new Midtown location, the Cotton Club was raking in the cash. In the third week alone, it grossed more than $45,000, and in the first sixteen weeks, the average weekly gross was $30,000. The prices in the new joint were higher than the Cotton Club’s in Harlem. A steak sandwich rose from $1.25 to $2.25. Scrambled eggs with Deerfield sausage rose from $1.25 to a $1.50 and lobster cocktails went from $1.00 to $1.50.

Still DeMange and Stark kept packing them in.

One price that did decrease was the Cottons Club’s cover charge. In Harlem, in order to keep the “undesirables” away, the cover charge was $3 per table. However, since blacks very rarely crossed the “Mason-Dixon Line” of 110th Street, the new Cottons Club’s cover charge was $2 per table during dinner time, and nothing after that.

The new Cotton Club continued to thrive until the summer of 1939, when the Internal Revenue Service hit the club’s management with indictments for income tax evasion. The indictments hit the Cotton Club Management Corp, including Herman Stark – President, George Goodrich, — Accountant, and Noah Braustein – Secretary-Treasurer, with four counts of failure to pay, and embezzlement of taxes. If convicted, all three men could face up to 25 years in prison, and fines of up to $20,000 apiece. Amazingly, because he was just listed as an employee, Frenchy DeMange escaped the indictment. At trial, the Cotton Club Management Corp. was found guilty, but the three officers escaped conviction. Still, Stark had to fork over a hefty fine to the government, in addition to $3,400 owed in back taxes.

At the start of 1940, it was obvious that the Cotton Club, and Herman Stark, had money problems. Besides the high Midtown rent and the effects of the Depression, the unions, especially the musician union, had a stranglehold on Stark and his profits. Before his problems with the I.R.S., Stark was skimming money off the top to make up for any shortfalls the unions and the high entertainment payrolls caused. But with the government watching the Cotton Club like a hawk, skimming was now impossible.

The Cotton Club closed its door for good on June 10th, 1940. Stark and DeMange gave no official reason, but as one columnist put it, the main reason was, “the lack of the famous, old filthy lucre.”

Yet, that explanation would be too simplistic. Of course money was a problem, but also America’s taste for music like Duke Ellington’s and Cab Calloway’s was changing too. The younger generation of Americans were enthralled with the new jazz and “swing” styles of white bandleaders like Tommy Dorsey, Artie Shaw, and the “King of Swing” — Benny Goodman.

The Cotton Club was a great idea whose lifespan had reached its conclusion. The black entertainers who had cut their teeth working at the Cotton Club, people like Duke Ellington, Cab Calloway, Louis Armstrong, Ella Fitzgerald, and Lena Horne, all went on to establish long and wondrous careers. But the concept of a night club with all black entertainment no longer appealed to the white mainstream of America.

The Cotton Club closed because it was a concept that had blossomed, then like a gilded rose, slowly died.

Still, the memory, and the impact of the Cotton Club on society will linger as long as song and dance remain an integral part of our American culture.

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Who Has Scored The Most Penalties In Football History TOP 10 Moments in Football History

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TOP 10 Moments in Football History

10. Luis Figo, world famous soccer star, who played for FC Barcelona from 1995 to 2000. He was probably the most favorite player of the fans in FC Barcelona, ​​until 2000. Then “it happened”, Barcelona’s biggest rival, Real Madrid, decided to splash the cash and break the transfer record by taking Luis to Real Madrid.

The move sparked outrage among Barcelona fans, with Madrid snapping him up for a world record £38 million. And then the fun begins, during the match between FC Barcelona and Real Madrid, when Luis Figo went to take a corner, a pig’s head was thrown at him from the Barcelona side. Another incident occurred during the 2004 EURO Cup final between Greece and Portugal. The Portuguese fan ran onto the pitch, managed to outrun the police and headed towards Luis, throwing a Barcelona shirt at him, with the whole world watching.

9. 1996 – African challenge.

1996 Atlanta Olympics The most surprising gold medals went to Nigeria’s soccer stars after they beat Brazil 4-3 in a thrilling semi-final. The final was between Argentina and Nigeria, watched by more than 2 billion people, of course most thought that Argentina would have no problem winning the gold medal, but most were wrong. Argentina were in the driver’s seat after taking a 1-0 lead. The goal came in the 3rd minute, scored by Claudio Lopez, and in the 28th minute, Nigeria managed to equalize, as Babayaro scored a perfect finish. So it was 1-1 at halftime. Early in the second half, Hernan Crespo gave Argentina the lead again and Argentina were on course to win the gold medals, but “not so fast” said Amokachi when he scored the equalizer to give Nigeria hope again. The game was almost over and everyone thought it would be decided by a penalty shootout. 90th minute and Amunike took the lead for Nigeria, it was a shock for Argentina, time was over, Argentina had no chance, so it ended with a final score of 3-2. Nigeria won the gold medal for the first time in the history of the Olympic Games.

8. 1960, The first UEFA European Football Championship (EURO) held in France. It was won by the USSR defeating Yugoslavia 2-1 in a tense final in Paris. However, it is quite interesting to note that earlier in the competition, Spain dropped their quarter-final match against the USSR for political reasons. It is interesting that the USSR also scored the first goal in EURO history, in the qualifying matches.

7. English Premier League season 1998/1999, Manchester United won all possible trophies that season. They became the first team in football history to do so in one season. First they won the Premier League title, finished top of the table, then they won the FA Cup title beating Newcastle United 2-0, and of course the most famous UEFA Champions League final, when United managed to come back from 1-0 down, and scored not one but two goals in stoppage time, beating Bayern Munich 2-1; it was considered to be one of the greatest comebacks ever.

6. World Championship 2002, Korea/Japan. Korean fans will never forget that historic moment, when Guus Hiddink took them all the way to the semi-finals of the 2002 World Cup. The Korean national football team became the first Asian national football team to reach the semi-finals of the World Cup. Nobody expected the underdogs to go as far, having beaten Portugal 1-0 in the group stage, followed up with a famous 2-1 win over Italy, drawn Spain in the quarter-finals and then beaten them 5-3 on penalties. However, in the end they could not compete against Germany in the semi-finals and lost 1-0. In the match for third place, the Korean national team met Turkey, but lost again. In the end, the Republic of Korea finished in 4th place at the 2002 World Cup, which was still a great success for the country’s national football team.

On 5 June 2003, Chelsea were bought by Russian billionaire Roman Abramovich for a record fee of £140 million. At the time, it was the biggest sale of an English football club. Roman immediately wanted to make Chelsea the best and strongest club in the world. He started buying players for a record transfer fee. The first season with the new owner FC Chelsea ended as the runner-up. But the following year, in the 2004/2005 season, Chelsea became champions of England for the first time since the 1954/1955 season. In the 2005/2006 season, they won the first league trophy again as they became champions of England for the second time in a row. These 2 seasons were the most successful 2 years in the history of the club.

4. On January 11, 2007, it was confirmed that David Beckham is leaving Real Madrid to play for the American “soccer” club Los Angeles Galaxy. Beckham’s decision was a shock to many, because one of the best soccer players in the world is moving to the United States of America, where “soccer” is not so popular. He was the first major player to enter Major League Soccer.

3. On February 6, 1958, the Munich air disaster. It was the darkest day in the history of Manchester United Football Club. The plane was carrying the Manchester United football team with the club’s fans and journalists. 23 of the 44 passengers on the plane died. Captain James Thane, the pilot made two attempts to take off, but both attempts were aborted due to engine drafts. When the third takeoff was attempted, the plane failed to reach the proper altitude and crashed into a fence around the airfield and then into a house. Now every year on this day, Manchester United hold a memorial to the people who lost their lives in the Munich air disaster.

2. The 2006 World Cup final produced one of the most famous moments in football history, when Zidane headed Italian defender Marco Materazzi. It was Zidane’s last international appearance for the French national team and was watched by 3 billion people worldwide. The next day, newspapers around the world didn’t write about Italy winning their fourth World Cup title, but they did write about Zidane pulling a “stunt” on Marco. It was definitely one of the greatest moments in football history.

1. Edison Arantes do Nascimento, aka Pele, the most famous name in the world of football. Football is probably the most famous sport in the world, and Pele is the man who made it what it is today. Pele played 669 games in club football and scored 626 goals. He also played 92 games for the Brazilian national team and scored 77 goals. He performed for the first time in the club when he was only 15 years old. He made his first international appearance for Brazil at the age of 16, and won his first World Cup at the age of 17. Pele is celebrated as a national hero in Brazil. The number one moment in football history is when Pele managed to score his first international goal for Brazil, just three months before his 17th birthday.

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