When To Take A Tight End In Fantasy Football Football Terminology – Tight End Passing Routes

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Football Terminology – Tight End Passing Routes

These routes and names being handed down are in line with the West Coast offensive scheme (Seattle Seahawks, Tampa Bay Buccaneers, Philadelphia Eagles, Green Bay Packers and San Francisco 49ers). This information is not intended to replace the terminology or execution that can be taught by a middle school, high school or Pop Warner coach. However, every single pass receiving route taught today at the amateur and professional level is derived from the same basic concepts. Therefore, I encourage you to implement these techniques as they will greatly improve your ability to run the route.

Passing roads of trees

The middle point – Designed to usually be the third read for the quarterback. The most important coaching tip for this route is to make sure you stop directly over the ball, 5-6 yards deep. Do not slip or slide until you make contact with the KB.

Dear – This is West Bank attack terminology for the route that entered the apartment. A big mistake that young players and even coaches make when using this route is to bend or go around the route. This just makes the Tight End easier to defend. A key coaching tip on this route is to pick a spot on the near sideline about 3-5 yards behind the line of scrimmage, then run as straight as possible to that spot.

Stick – Just 5 yards. This route can be run in different ways depending on the coverage, but in this case you will be practicing this route if you are in man coverage.

Tips for coaches:

– Let the ball go well

– At 4-6 yards behind the stick line of scrimmage, set and break the route with the inside leg, then run away from the defender slightly downhill. You should expect to catch the ball 3-4 yards deep.

Middle Cross/Flanker Drive – Another name for a 10-12 yard “inside” route.

Advice for trainers:

– Make the first 10 yards look like you are on a Go or Seam route. At 10-12 yards, fake a break outside, then plant, break and cut with your outside leg. When you reach the break, run gently downhill. You should expect to catch the ball 8-10 yards deep.

Option/Hook – This route is designed to take advantage of what the defender will give you. If he’s playing outside, you’ll break in. If the defender plays you with inside leverage, you will break the route on the outside.

Advice for trainers:

– Make sure you extend the defender at least 2-4 yards during the first 4-5 yards of your route. This will create separation and give the defender an opportunity to commit to an inside or outside lever.

Dig Deep – The West Coast offense uses this route in 3rd and long situations. The route is run similar to the Option/Hook, but 13-15 yards behind the line of scrimmage. Like the Option/Hook route, you must gain width in the initial 5 yards to spread the defender.

Shallow cross– Under route designed to take advantage of the Linebacker and 1 on 1 coverage. Make sure you get a good release from the line of scrimmage. Initially, run your route until you reach 4 yards deep, at which point fake your head slightly as if you’re going up, then break your route across the field. You will most likely expect to catch the ball where the opposing tackle will be.

Seam/Go – The basis of all passing roads. The key is to beat the man in front of you. Get a good line of scrimmage release and the first person to the 15 yard line wins!

Advice for trainers:

– Make sure you extend the defender at least 2-4 yards during the first 4-5 yards of your route. This will create separation between you and the middle linebacker and give you an opportunity to catch the ball between your man and the Free Safety. You will usually catch the ball 10-17 yards downfield.

Middle Cross/Flanker Drive (Middle Closed) – In some cases when the Tight runs Middle Cross, the Middle Linebacker will pick you up in coverage. Instead of trying to beat him across the field after the break, run towards him a good 2-3 steps and turn in the direction you came. Unstoppable play if read correctly by receiver and KB.

Skinny Post – This play works magic on cover 2. This play is triggered when the safeties jump the flag route.

Tips for coaches:

– Make sure you extend the defender at least 2-4 yards during the first 4-5 yards of your route. This will create separation between you and the Strong Side Linebacker, leaving room for the Post to run.

– At a distance of 10 to 12 yards from the line of scrimmage, take 1-2 steps as if starting a flag, then cut, plant, break with the outside leg and start the post. DO NOT RUN FOR SAFETY, he will turn you on if you catch the ball. After the cut, stay on the inside shoulder of the defender.

In some cases, it may feel like you are performing a stitch if the protective measures are tightly connected.

China – This route is designed to take advantage of Linebackers skipping the Drag route. The mechanics of this route are the same as Drag, but after 3-4 steps in Drag, stop and return to KB. Do not turn back or turn from the route. You simply have a step, plant and cut.

Deep Middle – This route is designed to take advantage of the middle linebacker in the Tampa Cover 2.

Tips for coaches:

– For the first 5-6 steps, let this route look like a shallow cross.

– When you get to where the offensive guard would be, then break your route downfield, then sit back and break your route 10-12 yards directly over the ball.

Seattle – This is the west coast version of the flag route. The only difference is the angle after the break. In the flag, the Tight End will try to hold the route high towards the cornerback pylon in the end zone. The route from Seattle, however, is flatter after a break to try to pass under Safeti. In some cases, the route may look almost like a 10-yard route.

The flag – Designed to expose Man or Cover 2 coverage.

Tips for coaches:

– Take a break at 10-12 yards. Don’t break your route too soon. Make the defender think you’re going the “Go” route for a touchdown, then break into the flag…

– On the break, cut with the outside leg, take two steps as if leading the post, then break it into the flag with the inside leg. After the break, run to the back corner pylon. Stay “skinny” and burn on the field.

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